Monday, May 31, 2010

A Day to Remember

In the midst of the hubbub of activities (barbecues, cook-outs, family outings, etc.) on this long weekend, it is well to take time to remember the many men and women who died while serving in the U.S. military. Perhaps the day will come when justice and peace will reign supreme in the world, and warfare is no more. We can always hope.


Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is Captain Rob's essay, "Schooner Windfall Sails into the Final Sunset." You can read it here:http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052110.htm.

Sunday, May 30, 2010

The Launch

One o'clock in the afternoon yesterday we launched my traditional Ocracoke skiff. Here is a photo gallery of the event. You can click on any photo to view a larger image.

Backing her down the ramp:



Off the trailer:



Ready to board:



Shoving off (Philip, Al, Lachlan, Tom, & David):


Away we go:


Underway:


And best of all -- she didn't sink!
At the dock, early Sunday morning:


Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is Captain Rob's essay, "Schooner Windfall Sails into the Final Sunset." You can read it here:http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052110.htm.

Saturday, May 29, 2010

Yes, But Will She Float?

She's one of the last wooden skiffs on Ocracoke island. My dad built her about 35 years ago, and she's been out of the water for at least six years. For more than a month I've been working to get her seaworthy again. I've gathered up anchors, life jackets, battery, whistle, and other necessary equipment. I've purchased a new boat hook, steering cables, fuel lines, paint, and assorted small parts. I've repaired the bilge pump, the trailer, and the 48 hp Evinrude outboard (mostly I just needed to replace the spark plugs, and clean the carburetors and fuel pump). The biggest challenge has been to get the juniper planks to swell up and close the seams.

She's a pretty boat...a traditional coastal North Carolina skiff, with a bit of flair at the bow to give her style. This is what she looks like today:



(Click on the photo to view a larger image.)

I'm hoping to launch her sometime today or tomorrow. I'll let you know if the seams have closed up enough to keep her afloat!

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is Captain Rob's essay, "Schooner Windfall Sails into the Final Sunset." You can read it here:http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052110.htm.

Friday, May 28, 2010

Descarte Revisited

Yesterday evening I was invited to an open house hosted by new Ocracoke Island property owners, Trisha and Gary. As it turned out the sixth grader who shared the joke with me three days ago was at the gathering with her parents. Her name is Caroline Temple. She was pleased that I had posted our encounter on the Journal. Caroline's brother Emmet overheard our conversation and offered another version of the joke:

Rene Descartes enters a bar. The bartender beckons him to the bar and asks, "Would you like a beer, sir?"

"Of course," replies Descartes, "I drink, therefore I am."


Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is Captain Rob's essay, "Schooner Windfall Sails into the Final Sunset." You can read it here:http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052110.htm.

Thursday, May 27, 2010

Lightship

Lorraine, a distant Ocracoke cousin, stopped by yesterday with a box full of papers her sister had collected. One included an account by C.C. Austin, master of the Diamond Shoals lightship during the 1933 hurricane. The ship was anchored thirteen miles off shore of Cape Hatteras. The hurricane hit the Outer Banks on September 15 and drove the ship, which was moored in place by a 5,500 pound mushroom anchor attached by 24,000 pounds of chain, five miles onto the Outer Diamond Shoals. Winds were clocked at 120 miles per hour. The first of many breakers to wash over the ship broke a port in the pilot house and struck the captain, lacerating his face and neck. One of the crew members was nearly washed overboard.

The lightship lay in the breakers for more than six hours as the storm sent wave after wave over the deck, carrying away life boats, ventilators, and anything else not bolted down. At times there was three feet of water in the engine-room bilges.

As the eye of the storm passed by Captain Austin was able to maneuver his ship into the open ocean. By 9 a.m. they were sixty miles east, northeast of the Cape Hatteras lighthouse. They had survived one of the worst storms ever to have struck the Outer Banks.

Captain Austin received a commendation from President Roosevelt for the "exceptional character of the services performed in saving this vessel, and in the protection of the shipping along the coast...."

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is Captain Rob's essay, "Schooner Windfall Sails into the Final Sunset." You can read it here:http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052110.htm.

Wednesday, May 26, 2010

Joke

Ocracoke is an interesting place. Yesterday afternoon as I stepped out the front door of the Village Craftsmen I greeted one of the island's sixth graders walking up Howard Street. She continued toward the Community Store, and I turned down Lawton Lane. After not very many feet I heard footsteps behind me. It was the sixth grader.

"I have a joke for you," she said with a smile.

"The famous philosopher Rene Descartes walks into a bar. The bartender says, 'Would you like a beer, sir?'

"'I think not,' replies Descartes, and with that...he vanishes."

Granted, this joke didn't elicit the belly laughs we had Sunday night telling stories about clams with false teeth (and you may be shaking your head if you haven't studied philosophy), but it does illustrate the interesting makeup of this small island community.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is Captain Rob's essay, "Schooner Windfall Sails into the Final Sunset." You can read it here:http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052110.htm.

Tuesday, May 25, 2010

Laughter

My cousin Sylvia and her friend Marie came over to the island this past weekend to visit Earl O'Neal. We sat on the pizer Saturday afternoon and talked for more than an hour. Sylvia and Marie came back to join us for supper. We shared stories, talked about childhood memories of Ocracoke, and laughed about our relatives' antics.

Earl told us he had a photograph of my father right after a hurricane. He was standing in water up to his neck. Well, actually he wasn't standing. He was being silly and kneeling, making it look like the water was much higher than it was! He also has a photo of my father holding a smiling clam. My dad had taken out his false teeth and inserted them between the open shells.

After supper we walked across the lane to visit Blanche. More stories flowed forth, and we all laughed some more. Blanche says the Howards always liked to laugh. She says it keeps us young. My Aunt Thelma is 97 years old. As she often reminds me, "No fools, no fun."

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is Captain Rob's essay, "Schooner Windfall Sails into the Final Sunset." You can read it here:http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052110.htm.

Monday, May 24, 2010

Rain

Today is not the day for relaxing on the beach. A light rain has been falling all morning, and forcasters are calling for a 70% chance of rain all day, with a possibility of thunderstorms. The sky is pewter gray. Pearls of water are dripping from the cedars, live oaks, and yaupons. The scene from my window is so different from the bright, sunny days of last week, but there is a certain tranquil beauty in this rainy, springtime morning.


Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is Captain Rob's essay, "Schooner Windfall Sails into the Final Sunset." You can read it here:http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052110.htm.

Sunday, May 23, 2010

Sunny Days & Cool Evenings

The weather this spring has been super -- warm, sunny days, just great to be outside in the yard, on the beach, or out on the water...and cool evenings, perfect for sleeping with the windows open. Forecasts are calling for some rain this week, which will be good for gardens and lawns, but daytime temperatures should remain in the low to mid seventies, and nightime temps will be in the mid sixties. We're enjoying it while it lasts.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is Captain Rob's essay, "Schooner Windfall Sails into the Final Sunset." You can read it here:http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052110.htm.

Saturday, May 22, 2010

Schooner Windfall Newsletter

Yesterday I published our latest Ocracoke Newsletter. This month we are honored to have a guest columnist, Captain Rob Temple of the Schooner Windfall. Many of our readers may have heard that the Windfall has been retired (though Captain Rob has not). Ocracoke now has another schooner (Windfall II) in Silver Lake harbor, at the Community Store dock.

You can read Captain Rob's essay, "Schooner Windfall Sails into the Final Sunset," here:
http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052110.htm

Friday, May 21, 2010

Peek-a-Boo

On Monday a reader left the following comment on this journal: "As I recall, there is also a pretty good view of the outside shower behind the house . . . if you care to watch naked people covered with soap."

The reader was referring, of course, to my outdoor shower...the one with the copper shower head, stained glass window, and view of the cedars, oaks, and starry sky.




Regarding the naked people (or person): Just click on the photo (if you dare)!

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter celebrates colorful islander Don Wood (1936-1998). You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042610.htm.

Thursday, May 20, 2010

The Ship's Medicine Chest

The other day I was looking through a few items I saved after my father died. He was born on Ocracoke, and worked on boats his entire life. In 1939 he purchased a book for $1.00, "The Ship's Medicine Chest and First Aid at Sea" (published, 1929).

In 1952, when I was 7 years old, he wrote this note inside the front cover, "This book has been a big help to us when any one of the family was sick. Hope to pass this book down to my boys. It has been worth the cost I paid for it."

Of course much of the information in the book is now outdated. Scurvy is a disease seldom encountered in the 21st century. And few of us today are prepared to surgically treat family or friends stricken with various venereal diseases.

Some of the book's information might be useful during a catastrophic emergency (e.g. "How to Tie an Artery"), although most of us today gladly defer to health care professionals.

I found the following entry of interest: "One of the great menaces to health aboard ship is vermin. Of these, the most prevalent is the cockroach, a filthy insect which can be gotten rid of by frequent fumigations and scrupulous cleanliness."

I was reminded of an account mentioned in a book, "Batavia's Graveyard," that I read several years ago: "The captain of one Danish East Indiaman was so maddened by the plague of scuttling vermin on board his ship that he offered his sailors a tot of brandy for every thousand cockroaches they killed. Within days the crushed bodies of 38, 250 insects had been presented to him for his inspection."

I believe I'll keep "The Ship's Medicine Chest" both to preserve a bit of history...and also just in case I might need it following a hurricane or other disaster. But let's hope I don't.

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[Ocracoke residents: Don't forget to get your re-entry stickers at the Community Center!
  • Thursday, May 20, 1pm - 4pm
  • Friday, May 21, 9am - 12pm]

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter celebrates colorful islander Don Wood (1936-1998). You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042610.htm.

Wednesday, May 19, 2010

Key

This morning Lou Ann reminded me of one of our favorite Ocracoke stories. A neighbor decided it was time for a new vehicle. He'd had his old pickup truck for many years, so he drove it to Norfolk and traded it in for a new one. As he was driving his new vehicle out of the lot he noticed the salesman running behind him waving his arms in the air. The Ocracoker stopped and rolled down his window as the salesman approached.

"How do you get the key out of the ignition?" the salesman wanted to know. "It seems to be permanently stuck."

"Beats me," the islander said. "I haven't had the key out of the ignition for fifteen years!"

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[Ocracoke residents: Don't forget to get your re-entry stickers at the Community Center!
  • Wednesday, May 19, 4pm - 7pm
  • Thursday, May 20, 1pm - 4pm
  • Friday, May 21, 9am - 12pm]

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter celebrates colorful islander Don Wood (1936-1998). You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042610.htm.

Tuesday, May 18, 2010

A Tribute To Joyce Reynolds

Joyce Reynolds has served as pastor of the Ocracoke United Methodist Church for more than eight years, longer than any other minister in island history. And she will be retiring in June. On Sunday evening parishioners and friends gathered at the Community Center to celebrate her life on Ocracoke and wish her well as she prepares to move to Hickory, NC.

A crowd gathered on the ramp outside the Community Center to greet Joyce as she arrived with David Tolson on his motorcycle (she told me she was more accustomed to riding Hondas than Harleys).



(Click on photo to view a larger image.)

Joyce has been an active part of the Ocracoke community, serving on various committees, helping in a variety of projects (her t-shirt quilts are ever popular items at island raffles), and volunteering with local organizations. Over the years she has been an active member of the Ocracoke Fire Department, helped distribute meals on wheels, clerked at the Preservation Society Museum, tutored at the school, and volunteered at the library, among other things.

Joyce is a no-nonsense kind of person who has always seen her calling as ministering, not only to the church, but to the entire community. Thus, it was no surprise to see the Community Center packed with neighbors and friends. Every seat was filled, with many standing to enjoy good food (it was a potluck dinner), fellowship, music, and a few short speeches.

The new Methodist minister will not be arriving until the first of August, so Joyce has agreed to stay on through July. We hate to see Joyce leave the island, and we wish her all the best in her retirement. At the same time we look forward to meeting the new Methodist minister in August.

If you see Joyce around the village be sure give her a hug and tell her how much we will miss her.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter celebrates colorful islander Don Wood (1936-1998). You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042610.htm.

Monday, May 17, 2010

Hurricane House

Ocracoke, of course, has a large number of rental houses, most with cable TV, Internet access, and other modern conveniences. There are a very few cottages that take you back to an Ocracoke Island of years gone by. The Hurricane House is one of those. (Click on any photo, below, to view a larger image.)



This house sits at the end of an unpaved road, overloooking Pamlico Sound. Guests enjoy sitting on the screened porch, looking across the marsh, and watching pelicans and other shore birds fly by.



They even have ring side seats for watching the Cedar Island and Swan Quarter ferries as they approach Silver Lake harbor.



But the grandest benefit of staying at the Hurricane House is the opportunity to witness some of the most spectacular sunsets on the east coast.



The Hurricane House is named for the account of a major storm penciled on the kitchen wall ("...5 pm Water coming into yard...10 pm Water to second step...12 pm Water to sills...")

The Hurricane House is truly a traditional old island home. It is comfortable, clean, and well cared for, but it has no TV, no microwave, no telephone, no dishwasher, and no A/C.

If you are interested in renting this house (I even understand that the week of May 30 is available) you can call the owner, Katharine Woodwell at 508-548-0680 (evenings & weekends).

If you're looking for a more conventional rental cottage go to http://www.ocracokevillage.com/ and click on "lodging."

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter celebrates colorful islander Don Wood (1936-1998). You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042610.htm.

Sunday, May 16, 2010

Sprucing Up

It's that time of year -- winter is behind us...and hot, humid, buggy weather has not yet arrived. Ocracoke islanders have been getting as many outdoor chores accomplished as possible. Just last week I had my outbuilding (Miss Wilma's turn-of-the-century wash house that I moved to my property about twenty years ago) repainted. Yesterday I gathered up all my tools, clam rakes, and assorted other items that were cluttering my yard and piled on my picnic table...and hung them on the outside of the wash house.

My neighbor was surprised that I decided not to repaint the green door (I'm just going to varnish over it). I think it adds character to the building.



(Click on the photo to view a larger image.)

If you haven't read about installing the hand pump, just click here. It's a great story.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter celebrates colorful islander Don Wood (1936-1998). You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042610.htm.

Saturday, May 15, 2010

Poe

"After incredible labor we succeeded, at length, in getting the long-boat over the side without material accident, and into this we crowded the whole of the crew and most of the passengers. This party made off immediately, and, after undergoing much suffering, finally arrived, in safety, at Ocracoke Inlet, on the third day after the wreck."

So writes Edgar Allan Poe in his 1844 short story "The Oblong Box." Inspired, perhaps, by the 1837 wreck of the steam packet "Home" on Ocracoke's beach, Poe weaves a tale of mystery, anguish, and death.

You never know where references to Ocracoke will show up. Read it sometime; it's only seven and a half pages long.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter celebrates colorful islander Don Wood (1936-1998). You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042610.htm.

Friday, May 14, 2010

"So those servants...

...went out into the streets and gathered all whom they found, both bad and good; so the ...hall was filled with guests." (Matthew 22:10)

My brother, his fiancee, and her parents came to the island yesterday. We expected them to stay for dinner, but they had to leave at 4:30. Ocracoke is such an informal place that we just invited several friends at the last minute, and by 6 o'clock we had a table covered with delicious food, and surrounded by family and friends.

I joked that the situation was like the parabolical king in the bible who gave a marriage feast for his son, and when the guests declined to come, sent his servants into the thoroughfares to invite as many as they could find. I leave it to the guests to decide if they were "bad" or "good."

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter celebrates colorful islander Don Wood (1936-1998). You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042610.htm.

Thursday, May 13, 2010

A Midsummer's Gallery

Many thanks to Emma Lovejoy who emailed me the following images from Ocracoke's recent production of A Midsummer Night's Dream, directed by Charles Temple.

Click on any photo to view a larger image.



























Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter celebrates colorful islander Don Wood (1936-1998). You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042610.htm.

Wednesday, May 12, 2010

Reentry Stickers

Not long ago I posted information about resident priority stickers for the Hatteras Inlet ferries. Just the other day I received a request from the Hyde County Emergency Management office asking me to post a notice about the issuance of Ocracoke Island Reentry stickers.

All island residents should know about these stickers, and island visitors might be interested in knowing about them also. In the event of an emergency (primarily a major hurricane that prompts a mandatory evacuation of Ocracoke Island) county officials want to limit immediate access back to the island after the event. Experience has shown that residents generally need several days for clean up (cutting and removing fallen trees, retrieving personal items, powerwashing steps and porches, etc.) and repair (replacing missing shingles and broken glass, fixing damaged boats and outboard motors, etc.). The electric company needs time to repair wires, transformers, and other equipment in order to restore power. Governmental organizations may need days to repair roads, bridges, ferry docks, campground facilities, etc. And it takes several days for delivery trucks to resume services to the island.

The county issues reentry stickers to residents who can provide a valid North Carolina driver's license and vehicle registration with an Ocracoke address. If these items show only a PO Box, a tax or utility bill with a physical address is needed. Non-resident owners of improved Ocracoke property are eligible for a reentry sticker by presenting proof of property ownership and a tax or utility bill.

If you qualify for reentry stickers you can obtain them at the Ocracoke Community Center on the following days:
  • Wednesday, May 19, 4pm - 7pm
  • Thursday, May 20, 1pm - 4pm
  • Friday, May 21, 9am - 12pm
You may also obtain stickers by faxing or mailing the appropriate items to the Hyde County Emergency Management Office, PO Box 95, Swan Quarter, NC, 27885.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter celebrates colorful islander Don Wood (1936-1998). You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042610.htm.

Tuesday, May 11, 2010

Puck & Buck

During the recent Ocracoke performance of "A Midsummer Night's Dream" I was reminded of a speculation that the island term "puck" may come from Shakespeare.

"Buck" is a common island word meaning pal or friend, and is used as a form of greeting, typically between men, as in the expression, "Hey Buck, how's it going?" (Buck is undoubtedly of ancient origin, from the word"bucca" (male goat) and "buc" (male deer), that in 18th century England came to mean "dashing fellow.")

"Puck" is used locally as a diminutive of Buck, and is generally used to address women, and children, or by women to address men...and sometimes implies a degree of impishness. In Shakespeare Puck is a jovial, but pranksterish wanderer of the night. I think it's a good guess that the early British settlers on Ocracoke brought with them both terms, Buck & Puck.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter celebrates colorful islander Don Wood (1936-1998). You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042610.htm.

Monday, May 10, 2010

Kites

Late last week, as I was approaching the "lifeguard beach" I noticed several large kites flying on the other side of the dunes. As I walked onto the beach a man and a woman were hoisting a huge lobster kite aloft. I called Lachlan, and he arrived in time to see several more sent heavenward. He even helped the woman bury one of the sand anchors. By the time we left there were 8 or 10 colorful kites flying and spinning above our heads.

I spoke briefly with the woman who gave me their web address (www.we-kite.com). She is part of a display kite team that exhibits along the east coast. We were fortunate that they were simply enjoying their kites, providing a free, open-to-the-public display of 200 & 300 square foot kites.

You can see some of their creations here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8dMmDejMihs.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter celebrates colorful islander Don Wood (1936-1998). You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042610.htm.

Sunday, May 09, 2010

Oh What a Beautiful Morning!

This day is just too gorgeous to sit for many minutes in front of a computer. It cooled off during the night. Right now it's just 60 degrees, but bright and sunny -- perfect to get a few things done outside. I'll be back tomorrow.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter celebrates colorful islander Don Wood (1936-1998). You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042610.htm.

Saturday, May 08, 2010

OPS

A couple of months ago Alex Klahm and one of his associates, of Architectural Metal and Design, made a presentation to the Ocracoke community about the restoration work they did on our lighthouse during the winter. Their talk and power point program was so informative, and so very interesting that they have been invited back to give their presentation for the spring membership meeting of the Ocracoke Preservation Society. Their first talk conflicted with several other community events so many people were unable to attend.

The spring meeting (a potluck supper followed by a brief business meeting, then the special presentation) will be held on Tuesday, May 11 at 6 pm at the Ocracoke Community Center. Everyone is invited to attend.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter celebrates colorful islander Don Wood (1936-1998). You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042610.htm.

Friday, May 07, 2010

Ceremony

For 67 years the Ocracoke community has honored the memory of four British sailors who are buried on the island. However, the ceremony remembers not only sub-lieutenant Thomas Cunningham, telegraphist Stanley Craig, and two unidentified crewmen of the HMT Bedfordshire, but the entire crew of the British armed trawler that was torpedoed by German U-boat U-558 on May 11, 1942, as well as all other British and Canadian seamen who gave their lives protecting our coast during World War II.

This year the ceremony will be held at 11 am today, Friday, May 7. Speakers will include representatives of the US Coast Guard, the British Royal Navy, the Canadian Navy, the Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum, and others.

The graveyard is maintained by the US Coast Guard and the Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum in cooperation with the British War Graves Commission.

"If I should die think only this of me, that there's some corner of a foreign field that is forever England." Rupert Brooke

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter celebrates colorful islander Don Wood (1936-1998). You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042610.htm.

Thursday, May 06, 2010

Just Get Outdoors

I just learned that Liz Doninique, naturalist guide of the outdoor adventure company, "Just Get Outdoors," is planning a fall nature retreat on Ocracoke. Entitled, Exploring Ocracoke Island and the Outer Banks for Women, the retreat is scheduled for October 3-10, 2010. They will be based at the Soundfront Inn overlooking Pamlico Sound. The group size is limited to 10 participants (women only). If you are interested in learning more about this opportunity, just click on this link: http://www.justgetoutdoors.com/details_ocracoke10.html

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter celebrates colorful islander Don Wood (1936-1998). You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042610.htm.

Wednesday, May 05, 2010

Windfall II

Yesterday, just before 1 pm, the schooner Windfall II motored into Silver Lake harbor. Somewhat smaller than her namesake, but with her trademark black hull (and soon to be fitted out with red sails), the Windfall II made the voyage from New Jersey under the command of Captain Rob Temple and a crew of two. The captain, at 65 years old, was the youngest on board. When I met the boat at the dock I commented that they reminded me of the crew of the Anna R. Heidritter, a four masted schooner that wrecked on Ocracoke's beach in 1942. Captain Bennett Coleman was 73 years old. His crew members were all over 65 years old.

Built in Bath, Maine as the Cohasset, the Heidritter burned to the waterline Jan. 22, 1907 while in Baltimore Harbor. Rebuilt in Maryland as the Anna R. Heidritter, she was re-launched in 1910. She survived a U-boat attack in WWI & carried bullets in her masts from the encounter. While carrying log wood from Charleston to Pennsylvania, she hit a storm off Ocracoke & was washed on a bar May 2, 1942. With her back broken, the crew lashed themselves to the masts. All were saved. Captain Coleman died in a car accident in New Jersey 9 days after being rescued.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter celebrates colorful islander Don Wood (1936-1998). You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042610.htm.

Tuesday, May 04, 2010

Early Morning Rain

A gentle rain is falling as I write. And there is a slight chance of thunderstorms later today. I am happy for the rain. It will nourish the plants and flowers in my yard. I don't have a lot of lush vegetation, but the rose bush seems to be thriving (three red blossoms are gracing my yard), the hydrangeas ("high-geraniums" in Ocracoke parlance) are healthy, the camelias are growing, and the narcissuses are blooming. The rain will also help the juniper planks in my wooden skiff swell up.

The last two weeks have given us superb weather for working outdoors, but frankly I'm a little worn out. So today will be the perfect day to write letters, pay bills, organize my desk, read it bit...and maybe even take an afternoon nap.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter celebrates colorful islander Don Wood (1936-1998). You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042610.htm.

Monday, May 03, 2010

Shakespeare Under the Live Oaks

Lachlan and I wandered over to School Road yesterday morning to watch a portion of the dress rehearsal for A Midsummer Night's Dream. The play will be performed outdoors on two alternating stages -- the "live oak stage" next to Books to be Red, and the parking area in front of Deepwater Theater. Lachlan was fascinated by the costumes and the action (I don't think he got much of the plot). He said he "had the best seat in the house" (in the crook of a cedar tree).

The play is an Ocracoke high school production, but because of the size of our school the cast includes younger children as well as several adults from the community. It is quite an undertaking...and lots of fun!

Come on out for the shows: Thursday (May 6) & Friday (May 7) at 5 pm, and Sunday (May 9) at 2 pm. Tickets ($6 for adults & $4 for kids) are available at the school office, or from director Charles Temple (252-921-0462).

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter celebrates colorful islander Don Wood (1936-1998). You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042610.htm.

Saturday, May 01, 2010

OISFT

The 27th annual Ocracoke Island Surf Fishing Tournament was held the last two days. Sixty-nine teams participated, competing for points (based on size of the fish), most fish caught, and largest fish caught.

I don't know all of the details (maybe one of our readers does), but one 30 1/4 inch striper was landed Thursday morning.

The catch-and-release event ended yesterday evening with a pig pickin' (B-B-Q, cole slaw, potatoes, and black-eyed-peas) and awarding of trophies and prizes at the Community Center.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter celebrates colorful islander Don Wood (1936-1998). You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042610.htm.