Monday, September 30, 2013

Anole

When I was a child I was fascinated by the little bright green lizards that ran around my grandparents' rear boardwalk, crawled up the sides of the wooden cistern, and often found their way inside the house.

We called them chameleons because they could change color to match their background. Today I recognize them as "Carolina Anoles" (Anolis carolinensis).

They still fascinate. Below is a photo of one of several I encountered on the Hammock Hills Nature Trail recently.


















Our most recent Ocracoke Newsletter is a compilation of humorous stories told by or about islanders. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news092113.htm

Sunday, September 29, 2013

Nets

The following photo is from a 1950s/1960s era postcard showing nets drying on a rack on the shore of Silver Lake.














I took the following photo this month at the large parking area near the Preservation Museum. It shows fishermen's nets spread out for routine maintenance.




















The fishing tradition lives on.

Our most recent Ocracoke Newsletter is a compilation of humorous stories told by or about islanders. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news092113.htm

Saturday, September 28, 2013

Concert

This coming Monday, September 30, at 7:30 pm, the legendary folk musician Si Kahn and the internationally acclaimed German bluegrass band, The Looping Brothers, will present a concert at Deepwater Theater.

In addition to performing, Si Kahn has worked for over 45 years as a civil rights and labor & community organizer. Si founded Grassroots Leadership, a Southern-based national organization, in 1980.

Tickets are $15 for adults; $7 for kids. You may reserve tickets by calling 252-921-0260. This concert is sponsored by our own roots & folk band, Molasses Creek.

Mark your calendars. This is a show not to be missed!

Our most recent Ocracoke Newsletter is a compilation of humorous stories told by or about islanders. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news092113.htm.  


Friday, September 27, 2013

Ocracoke Methodist Episcopal Church

As mentioned yesterday, a congregation of the Methodist Episcopal Church (Ocracokers called this the "Northern Church") was established on the island in 1883. Wesley Chapel, constructed in part from timbers salvaged from a shipwreck, was built on the Back Road (where Zillie's is located today).

Ocracoke Methodist Episcopal Church














To read a complete history of the two Ocracoke Island Methodist Churches (and why they became divided...and later reunited), click here

Our most recent Ocracoke Newsletter is a compilation of humorous stories told by or about islanders. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news092113.htm

Thursday, September 26, 2013

Ocracoke Methodist Episcopal Church, South

The first church on Ocracoke was established in 1828. In 1844 the national Methodist Church split over the issue of slavery. The Ocracoke charge, like most Methodist churches below the Mason-Dixon Line, became part of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.

So. Church, Howard St.




















Over the following years the "Southern Church" met in several different buildings. The most recent edifice was located midway on Howard Street, where Dicie's Cottage is today.

In 1883 a congregation affiliated with the Methodist Episcopal Church (the "Northern Church") was established on the island (more about that church tomorrow).

In 1939 the Methodist Episcopal Church, South; the Methodist Episcopal Church; and the Methodist Protestant Church united to form a new Methodist Church. Both Ocracoke Island churches were dismantled, and the present Ocracoke United Methodist Church was built on School Road. It was dedicated July 4, 1943.

Click here for a complete history of the Ocracoke Methodist Church.

Our most recent Ocracoke Newsletter is a compilation of humorous stories told by or about islanders. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news092113.htm

Wednesday, September 25, 2013

Soundside Campground

Below is another photo from the 1965-1966 brochure advertising Hyde County mainland and Ocracoke Island.

This photo shows the campground that was located between the OPS museum and the NPS Visitors Center...where the large day use parking area is today. (Follow the directions to the left to enlarge the image.)


















Does this scene look familiar to any of our readers?

Our most recent Ocracoke Newsletter is a compilation of humorous stories told by or about islanders. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news092113.htm

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

NPS Campsite

I am wondering if any of our readers remember the cold water hand pump showers at the NPS campground in the mid 1960s.

This photo below is from a 1965-1966 booklet promoting Hyde County mainland and Ocracoke Island. (Follow the directions to the right to enlarge the image.)


















Our most recent Ocracoke Newsletter is a compilation of humorous stories told by or about islanders. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news092113.htm

Monday, September 23, 2013

No, Not One!

In the late 1800s there were two Methodist churches on Ocracoke. The Methodist Episcopal Church (the "Northern Church") was located on the Back Road; the Methodist Episcopal Church, South (the "Southern Church") was on Howard Street.

The two churches were not far apart "as the crow flies" and, in the summer months when the windows were open, they often competed informally to demonstrate which congregation's hymn singing was more robust.

My father delighted in telling me of the Sunday morning when the southern church had just finished singing "Will There Be Any Stars in My Crown?" The last notes were wafting through the village when the northern church launched into "No, Not One." 

Our most recent Ocracoke Newsletter is a compilation of humorous stories told by or about islanders. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news092113.htm.  

Sunday, September 22, 2013

Beeswax

Whether their ancestors were unloaded from Spanish treasure ships, were brought to the island by the earliest settlers, or swam ashore from shipwrecks, Ocracoke's "banker ponies" (actually small, compact horses) have been an important part of island history and culture for many years. They served as beasts of burden, steeds, "members" of the US Life Saving Service, mounts for Ocracoke Boy Scout Troop 290, and now, as tourist attractions.

An Ocracoke Island Pony


















Ocracoke Opry performer, Roy Parsons (1921-2007), occasionally told a story about Beeswax, a memorable Ocracoke pony who liked to stick his head through open windows and munch on homemade biscuits.

I just learned that in May of 1922 Beeswax, a dun polo pony, was sold at Tattersall's Bloodstock Auction House in central London for 61 guineas (the guinea [an old English coin equivalent to 1 pound, 1 shilling], survives in the horse trade as a unit of commerce).

Beeswax was a valuable stallion colt, and was brought to the island in 1925 by a Mr. Keppel. Older islanders remember Beeswax as a large brown horse that was kept in a sturdy pen on Ocracoke for several years.

The idea was to breed Beeswax (according to Jean Day in her book, Banker Ponies, an Endangered Species, his father was "one of the best polo ponies in America") with various Ocracoke mares. The goal was to produce a new, tougher, more intelligent breed of polo ponies. Because the foals were sold off the island, Beeswax's DNA probably never made it into the local pony gene pool.

However, Ocracoke Island pony DNA has surely made it into the polo pony gene pool...another example of Ocracoke's far-reaching influence on the outside world.

Our most recent Ocracoke Newsletter is a compilation of humorous stories told by or about islanders. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news092113.htm

Saturday, September 21, 2013

September Newsletter

We have just published our most recent Ocracoke Newsletter, a compilation of several humorous stories told by or about islanders.

You can read the Newsletter here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news092113.htm.

We hope you get a chuckle out of it.

Friday, September 20, 2013

To Sleep

Not long ago I stepped into an elderly neighbor's house. She was taking a nap, and a relative had left a bowl of soup with a short note ("I brought this soup for you, but you were to sleep.")

Ocracokers routinely use "to" when mainlanders use "at." For example, "She works to the Post Office," or "He's down to the store right now."

I wondered if "asleep" is a contraction of "at sleep"...and if islanders (who still retain many old world English expressions) would have historically said "to sleep" rather than "at sleep." That would explain how the expression "to sleep" has been preserved here, even into the 21st century.

According to Dictionary.com the "a" in "asleep" is "a reduced form of the Old English preposition on, meaning “on,” “in,” “into,” “to,” “toward,” preserved before a noun in a prepositional phrase, forming a predicate adjective or an adverbial element ( afoot; abed; ashore; aside; away )...."

Interesting stuff...at least I find it interesting!

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an account of the recent skirmishes islanders have had with North Carolina legislatures over the issue of ferry tolls...and a 1955 newspaper editorial advocating free, state-operated ferries across Hatteras Inlet. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082113.htm.

Thursday, September 19, 2013

Cattails

They are considered an invasive species, but I have always liked cattails (Typha), a unique plant with a sausage shaped conglomeration of tiny flowers on its long, slender stem.

Cattails on the Edge of a Wetland Near the Nature Trail















I don't know how long cattails have been growing on Ocracoke Island, but I don't remember seeing any when I was a youngster. Cousin Blanche says there never were many on the island. She was about fourteen years old when she first saw cattails.

Blanche and several friends walked "Up Trent" to see a stand of cattails that had sprouted at the edge of a small wetland area. Islanders were cutting them to include in dry table arrangements. She speculates that perhaps seeds washed over here during a hurricane.

Today cattails can be seen at the edges of the marsh near Island Creek and elsewhere in the National Park.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an account of the recent skirmishes islanders have had with North Carolina legislatures over the issue of ferry tolls...and a 1955 newspaper editorial advocating free, state-operated ferries across Hatteras Inlet. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082113.htm.

Wednesday, September 18, 2013

Valentine Robinson

The Outer Banks has long attracted colorful and unconventional characters.

According to Kenneth Burke in his book, The History of Portsmouth, North Carolina From Its Founding in 1753 to Its Evacuation in the Face of Federal Forces in 1861, a pilot at Portsmouth Island was charged with blasphemy in 1843.

Carteret County Superior Court minutes quote Robinson as saying, "God (meaning God, the Almighty maker of Heaven and Earth) is a fool. I (meaning the said Valentine Robinson) wish that he (meaning God) was here. I (meaning the said Valentine Robinson) would eat him (meaning God) with potatoes; to the high displeasure of Almighty God and against the peace and dignity of the State..."

I can only wonder what prompted Valentine Robinson's sacrilege.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an account of the recent skirmishes islanders have had with North Carolina legislatures over the issue of ferry tolls...and a 1955 newspaper editorial advocating free, state-operated ferries across Hatteras Inlet. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082113.htm.

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

The "Almost Ghost" Story

Guests and staff at the Island Inn have been telling stories about Mrs. Godfrey's ghost for more than half a century. You can read about her in my book, Digging up Uncle Evans.














Recently I had the good fortune to hear another story about the "ghost" at the inn. A guest had collected a number of shells on the sound side of the island. She lined them up on a shelf in her room, then went out sightseeing with her husband. On their return one of the shells had mysteriously been moved.

This happened several times. The guest had heard stories of Mrs. Godfrey's impish behavior, and was spooked. When she found the shell moved again she accused her husband of playing tricks on her. He denied it. Finally convinced that her husband was not the culprit, she slept uneasily that night. When she awoke at 2 a.m. and saw the shell on the floor she immediately called the front desk, and demanded to be moved to another room, one that was not haunted. Of course, the inn was full, and there were no spare rooms. The guest stayed awake the rest of the night.

In the morning light she noticed the shell moving across the floor. Spindly legs extended from under the shell. The hermit crab was marching around searching for salt water.

Embarrassed, the inn's guest reported the solution of the mystery to the front desk...and returned the hermit crab to its home in the sound.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an account of the recent skirmishes islanders have had with North Carolina legislatures over the issue of ferry tolls...and a 1955 newspaper editorial advocating free, state-operated ferries across Hatteras Inlet. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082113.htm.

Monday, September 16, 2013

The Russell L

Travel to and from Ocracoke in the 19th century was quite a bit different from today.

In his book, The Life and Times of F. M. Wilkinson, George Wilkinson describes a journey across Pamlico Sound on the sailing vessel, Russell L:

"The Russell L. cut through the waters of the Pamlico times too numerous to count. One of several carriers that made the trip between Fowle's dock in Washington [NC] and Ocracoke, the Russell L. was one of the only means of transportation from the island to the mainland. As one passenger remembers, 'the trip was long and the boards hard but sleeping under stars was wonderful.' The trips were scheduled from dusk to dawn."

Click here to see a photo of the Russell L: http://www.ncroots.com/Beaufort/page176.jpg.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an account of the recent skirmishes islanders have had with North Carolina legislatures over the issue of ferry tolls...and a 1955 newspaper editorial advocating free, state-operated ferries across Hatteras Inlet. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082113.htm.

Sunday, September 15, 2013

Colorful O'cockers

Ocracoke islanders enjoy traveling. Years ago they may not have left the island often, but when they did they usually traveled by schooner, often to large northeastern cities such as Baltimore, Philadelphia and New York.

Most Ocracokers didn't want to be away from home very long. And few wanted to move to the city. However, in the first half of the twentieth century many men left home looking for work.

Some years ago I was teasing a particularly colorful islander. In his presence I said (fallaciously) to a visitor that he was originally from [a section of a large city in the northeast]. "Dey blessed Father," was his immediate rejoinder, "I'd rather be in Hell with my back broke!"

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an account of the recent skirmishes islanders have had with North Carolina legislatures over the issue of ferry tolls...and a 1955 newspaper editorial advocating free, state-operated ferries across Hatteras Inlet. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082113.htm.

Saturday, September 14, 2013

Internet & Comments/Questions

I have only had sporadic & much interrupted Internet service for several days. If you left a comment or question recently you might want to check now to see if I have left a reply (I just recently have had service long enough to respond).

NC Sharpie Schooner

I am not sure how I acquired these 1953 construction drawings for a North Carolina Oyster Sharpie Schooner, but thought it would be fun to share them with our readers.

To view larger, better quality images please follow the instructions just to the right.


















Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an account of the recent skirmishes islanders have had with North Carolina legislatures over the issue of ferry tolls...and a 1955 newspaper editorial advocating free, state-operated ferries across Hatteras Inlet. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082113.htm.

Friday, September 13, 2013

Crab Spider

Every once in a while I stumble across an intriguing and unusual spider. This one we call a crab spider because of its shape and its six spiny projections. Biologists call this critter a "Crablike Spiny Orbweaver" (Gasteracantha concriformis).


















I encountered this fellow busily weaving a web across the trail at Hammock Hills. I ducked under, and didn't disturb him at all.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an account of the recent skirmishes islanders have had with North Carolina legislatures over the issue of ferry tolls...and a 1955 newspaper editorial advocating free, state-operated ferries across Hatteras Inlet. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082113.htm.

Thursday, September 12, 2013

Lightering

Kenneth Burke in his book, The History of Portsmouth, North Carolina From Its Founding in 1753 to Its Evacuation in the Face of Federal Forces in 1861, writes "[i]f there is one word which can explain the development of Portsmouth, it is the word 'lightering.'"

Too far from any centers of population, Portsmouth was not destined to become a major port. However, its location was perfect for the establishment of a lightering enterprise at Ocracoke Inlet, a crucial transportation juncture.

For approximately one hundred years, beginning in the mid 1700s, most ships bound for mainland ports in North Carolina had to pass through Ocracoke Inlet. Treacherous shoals and shallow water over the swash (a channel of water over a sandbank) prevented larger vessels from passing through the inlet unless portions of their cargo had been transferred to smaller, lighter, shallow draft vessels.

By 1860 the population of Portsmouth village had peaked at 685 inhabitants. After the Civil War steamships and railroads quickly replaced sailing vessels for transporting goods along the eastern seaboard, and Portsmouth's population steadily declined. Today Portsmouth has no permanent residents.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an account of the recent skirmishes islanders have had with North Carolina legislatures over the issue of ferry tolls...and a 1955 newspaper editorial advocating free, state-operated ferries across Hatteras Inlet. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082113.htm.

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

Common Some

In a joking comment, I "accused" a neighbor of committing a less-than-ethical deed. "I'm not that common," was his rejoinder.

On Ocracoke, "common" means "low," "inferior," "base," or "tawdry." It is often used in the expression "common some" meaning "very common," as in "He never leaves more than a 5% tip. He's common some!"

Just one more Ocracoke expression being preserved by islanders. 

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an account of the recent skirmishes islanders have had with North Carolina legislatures over the issue of ferry tolls...and a 1955 newspaper editorial advocating free, state-operated ferries across Hatteras Inlet. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082113.htm.

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Another Stinging Critter

Not long ago I was walking through some low vegetation near my house, and I felt a sting on my calf. Instinctively, I slapped at it. There was a caterpillar clinging to my leg, so I brushed it off. The sting lasted for several minutes.

The Stinging Caterpillar















Last year I wrote about the sting I got from the larva of the Gulf Fritillary Butterfly. This is a different caterpillar. I did some Internet research, but have not been able to identify this critter. Maybe some of our readers can tell me about this caterpillar. Please leave a comment if you can.

Our most recent Ocracoke Newsletter is a compilation of humorous stories told by or about islanders. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news092113.htm

Monday, September 09, 2013

Clock Clinic

Do you have a vintage clock or watch...a wind up clock that has sentimental value...but that no longer runs?  If so, and you would like to have it evaluated by a professional clock repairman, contact Janey Jacoby at ofpa332 at gmail dot com.


















Edgar Hume, clock repairman, will be on the island until September 20, and he will be holding a clock clinic as a fundraiser for the Ocracoke Volunteer Fire Department.

Even though the clinic is a fundraiser for OVFD (Edgar is donating all of the money to the Fire Department) the clinic will be held in the Methodist Church Recreation Hall on School Road. 

Edgar will offer the following services:
  • Evaluate your vintage clock and do a simple fix, if needed, for $10.00 per clock. 
  • Evaluate a pocket watch or a music box and do a simple fix, if needed, for $10.00 each. 
  • Should the clock or music box be too hard to carry, a picture or two would do for an evaluation.
If you have a floor clock that needs to be seen, the cost is $75.

Please, no plug in or battery clocks.

Many thanks to Edgar for this service to our community, and especially to the Ocracoke Volunteer Fire Department. 

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an account of the recent skirmishes islanders have had with North Carolina legislatures over the issue of ferry tolls...and a 1955 newspaper editorial advocating free, state-operated ferries across Hatteras Inlet. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082113.htm.

Sunday, September 08, 2013

A Tale of Blackbeard

Starting in the summer of 1974, until the summer of 1994, Julia Howard's original 3 act musical, A Tale of Blackbeard, was performed nine different seasons on Ocracoke. Originally staged in the old School Recreation Hall (now the "Topless Oyster" restaurant), as well as on the porch of the Community Store and in the School Gymnasium, the play attracted large crowds each evening.

Tomorrow evening (Monday, September 9, 2013) a video of one of the performances will be screened at 7 pm at Deepwater Theater. The showing is free, and the public is invited.

Below is a YouTube video of the "pirates" performing two of their numbers ("Avast" and "Ocracoke Cutie") at Ocracoke's July 4th celebration in 1990.



I have heard rumors that several islanders have been talking about trying to revive the performance some summer. We'll keep you posted.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an account of the recent skirmishes islanders have had with North Carolina legislatures over the issue of ferry tolls...and a 1955 newspaper editorial advocating free, state-operated ferries across Hatteras Inlet. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082113.htm.  

Saturday, September 07, 2013

Parties

Yesterday's post reminded me of Ken McAlpine's 2004 book, Off Season. So I went back and skimmed through his chapter on Ocracoke where he relates attending a pot luck supper at my house. This is what he writes:

"'One of the nicest things about living on Ocracoke,' [Philip said], 'is there's very little pretension. Everybody knows who you really are. I don't know what evening get-togethers are like off the island anymore, but I suspect they're kind of stiffer. Here it's more like family. You're not trying to impress anybody about anything because everybody knows you.'

"I thought of parties I'd been to; strangers often react to one another by subtly, or not so subtly, marking their place, mentioning their job (neurologist), or their children's accomplishments (elementary school neurologist), or maybe how they once saw the top of Oliver Sacks's head moving across the airport concourse. It was like dogs peeing on trees. On this night I had been spared this uncomfortable ritual. People accepted me as I was and offered themselves as they were. I had enjoyed it immensely."

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an account of the recent skirmishes islanders have had with North Carolina legislatures over the issue of ferry tolls...and a 1955 newspaper editorial advocating free, state-operated ferries across Hatteras Inlet. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082113.htm.

Friday, September 06, 2013

Milky Way

Visitors to Ocracoke are often amazed when they look up at the night sky, and see numerous constellations, shooting stars, and that swath of stellar real estate we call the Milky Way, the spiral galaxy that includes our solar system.

Ocracoke Island is blessed with very little light pollution, a rarity in our highly developed country. On moonless nights the Milky Way is clearly visible from my front yard in the middle of the village. It is even more spectacular on the beach.

The following stunning photo was taken by Craig Roberts, and was first published last month on his blog, "Lacey And Craig:













Click on the following link to read an excellent recent article, "Let There Be Dark," about Ocracoke's night sky and the value of protecting our nighttime  views: http://www.kcet.org/updaily/socal_focus/commentary/west-is-eden/let-there-be-dark.html.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an account of the recent skirmishes islanders have had with North Carolina legislatures over the issue of ferry tolls...and a 1955 newspaper editorial advocating free, state-operated ferries across Hatteras Inlet. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082113.htm.

Thursday, September 05, 2013

Deer Track

There have been reports of deer on Ocracoke for more than a decade. Islanders and visitors have routinely seen deer tracks in various places in the National Seashore. Several years ago, in the early morning hours, I even spotted two deer running in front of my car just north of the NPS campground.

But I hadn't heard about deer sightings, or seen evidence of them, for quite a while...until I noticed a deer track on the Hammock Hills Nature Trail a couple of weeks ago.

I took this photo, but unfortunately the track is difficult to see, even highlighted with the oval. But it was definitely a deer track.




















Please leave a comment if you've seen deer on Ocracoke recently.
 
Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an account of the recent skirmishes islanders have had with North Carolina legislatures over the issue of ferry tolls...and a 1955 newspaper editorial advocating free, state-operated ferries across Hatteras Inlet. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082113.htm.

Wednesday, September 04, 2013

Mud Fiddler

It is that time of year again. Mud Fiddlers are emerging along wet, muddy areas close to the sound. Hundreds of them scurry away or get under foot on out-of-the-way paths on Ocracoke and Portsmouth.

This fellow stopped to defend himself as I bent over to take his photograph.
















Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an account of the recent skirmishes islanders have had with North Carolina legislatures over the issue of ferry tolls...and a 1955 newspaper editorial advocating free, state-operated ferries across Hatteras Inlet. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082113.htm.

Tuesday, September 03, 2013

Pit Viper?

I have heard it said often that there are no venomous snakes on Ocracoke. Our family has always been skeptical. Almost a century ago my Uncle Enoch was bitten on the foot as he was running barefoot through the edge of the marsh. He was taken off the island, and had infected tissue and bone removed.

A few days ago, as I was walking along the path at Hammock Hill Nature Trail I spotted a dark snake lying on the boardwalk. I didn't have my camera with me, so I pulled out my brand new smart phone. I intended to take a still photo, but because I hadn't yet mastered the settings, I took the video below by mistake. The video is a bit jumpy because I kept moving the camera and pressing the button in my vain attempt to snap a photo.

video
 
By the time I figured out my mistake the snake had slithered away. I never got a clear look at its head, but I have the distinct impression that it was triangular.
 
Below is a Wikipedia photo of a cottonmouth. Note the light colored areas on the lower part of its body, and compare with the video (you might be able to get a decent still shot by pausing the video at 10 seconds).
 
(Photo by Fjguyote)
 
You be the judge.
 
Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an account of the recent skirmishes islanders have had with North Carolina legislatures over the issue of ferry tolls...and a 1955 newspaper editorial advocating free, state-operated ferries across Hatteras Inlet. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082113.htm.

Monday, September 02, 2013

Porstmouth Island Meeting

 
FRIENDS OF PORTSMOUTH ISLAND
Fall Meeting Reminder
 
Saturday, September 21, 2013 @ 10:00 A.M.
Core Sound Waterfowl Museum & Heritage Center
Harkers Island, North Carolina
 
Dr. Sue Stuska, Wildlife Biologist, Cape Lookout National Seashore
"Wild Horses of The Outer Banks"
 
Jim White:  "Portsmouth and the Civil War"
(subject of Jim's latest book)
 
Brief Business Meeting, including Homecoming update
 
Door Prizes and Light Lunch
 
-------------------------------
 
Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an account of the recent skirmishes islanders have had with North Carolina legislatures over the issue of ferry tolls...and a 1955 newspaper editorial advocating free, state-operated ferries across Hatteras Inlet. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082113.htm.

Sunday, September 01, 2013

Pewter Plates

Several weeks ago one of my neighbors called and left a message on my phone. He had just acquired some pewter plates that he wanted me to see.
















This dinnerware (the large plate is about 12" in diameter) was salvaged at an old home site near Pamlico Sound about 75 years ago by a young girl who was visiting the island from the mainland. She recently sold the plates at a yard sale, and the buyer returned them to Ocracoke.

Two of the plates have "London" embossed on the reverse side, but we were unable to locate a date. They appear to be from the 1700s. Who knows, they may even have belonged to Blackbeard.

Click on this link to see a photo of very similar pewter plates that were salvaged from Blackbeard's flagship, the Queen Anne's Revenge: http://news.ncdcr.gov/2013/05/30/pirate-talk-and-pirate-treasure-at-cultural-resources-western-office-on-june-8/. They are strikingly similar. I understand that salvors of the Queen Anne's Revenge confirm that these Ocracoke plates are of the same vintage.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an account of the recent skirmishes islanders have had with North Carolina legislatures over the issue of ferry tolls...and a 1955 newspaper editorial advocating free, state-operated ferries across Hatteras Inlet. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082113.htm