Saturday, June 21, 2014

Early Island Education

As early as 1785 records indicate that Ocracoke residents were concerned with education. On August 20 of that year the estate of Jobe Wahab made a payment of 4 pounds, 16 shillings to Henry Garrish for "gradeschooling" his son, Thomas Wahab. No doubt Henry Garrish, who likely hailed from New England, was a private tutor.

On February 04, 1808, William Howard sold "a certain parcell of land lying where the schoolhouse now stans…." In that 1808 deed William Howard also granted the subscribers of the schoolhouse the "priviledge of giting wood for the benefit of sd School house as far as get enuff for the use of the house of any kind except live oak and cedar…." Presumably he was granting the privilege of cutting firewood on the remainder of his property, which he still owned.

One year later, in 1809, Edmond Dailey, one of the witnesses to the 1808 deed, rented land from John Williams. Early in the twentieth century it was said that John Williams' "shell pile" could still be seen near where the Thurston House Bed & Breakfast now sits. This land borders the land owned by William Howard in the early 1800's. The rental agreement, which states that Edmond Dailey would have a house, pig pen and fig orchard, also mentions that Dailey was a school master.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the curious story of Vera/Charlie Williams. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052114.htm.   


Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the curious story of Vera/Charlie Williams. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052114.htm

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