Friday, September 19, 2014

Talk Like a Pirate Day

Arrrrgh, Mateys!

Well, shiver me timbers, today is "International Talk Like a Pirate Day." So dust off your cutlass, don a tricorn hat, or tuck a treasure map inside your dress (if you're not an Anne Bonney or Mary Reed, you might consider different attire)...and face the world of land lubbers like the buccaneer you know you can be.

If you need a bit of encouragement, check out this web site: http://www.talklikeapirate.com/piratehome.html. Remember, talk like a pirate. You can do it!

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of late 19th century steamship traffic to Ocracoke, and the large Victorian hotel that accommodated the guests. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082114.htm.




Thursday, September 18, 2014

Lorena, Ira & Elsie

I recently received a copy of this photograph, taken about 1896. Seated is Lorena Howard Wyche, and two of her three children, Ira Thomas and Elsie Marvin.


















Ira's grand-daughter, Liz Williamson, sent me the picture. It was taken shortly before Lorena died. She was only 31 years old. Elsie continued to live on Ocracoke the rest of her life. Ira went to West Point, and served in WWII as a two-star General.


















You can read General Wyche's story here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news092110.htm.

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Coming right up -- International Talk Like a Pirate Day! Click on the logo below for more information:

http://www.talklikeapirate.com/

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of late 19th century steamship traffic to Ocracoke, and the large Victorian hotel that accommodated the guests. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082114.htm.

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Answers

A recent issue of Time magazine ("The Answers Issue, Everything You Never Knew You Needed to Know"), includes some interesting statistics.

Average length of an American worker's one-way commute, in minutes -- 25.5 (for Ocracokers it's maybe 2 or 3)

Percentage of commuters who leave their county to work -- 25% (for Ocracokers this is essentially zero)

Average distance in miles that Americans live from the nearest Walmart-- 6.7 (that's probably about 10 minutes; for Ocracokers it is about 3 hours)

Percentage of Americans who live within 3 miles of McDonalds -- 75% (0% for Ocracokers; we are about 2 1/2 hours from the nearest McDonalds)

Percentage of Americans who live within 60 minutes of a body of water-- 90% (all Ocracokers, of course, live within just a couple of minutes of water)

Percentage of Americans who live within 60 minutes of a National Park -- 75% (all Ocracokers, of course, live within just a few minutes of the Cape Hatteras National Seashore)

Life is in large measure about choices. We islanders generally choose nature, community, and family over convenience, high-paying jobs, and proximity to shopping centers, fast food...even doctors and dentists. Island life is not for everyone.

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Coming right up -- International Talk Like a Pirate Day! Click on the logo below for more information:

 http://www.talklikeapirate.com/

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of late 19th century steamship traffic to Ocracoke, and the large Victorian hotel that accommodated the guests. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082114.htm.

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Toads

Sometimes toads are numerous on Ocracoke, and sometimes they seem rare. I think it might have a lot to do with storms and hurricanes.

Many ground dwelling critters must die when high tides wash over the island. And it must take a while for the remaining individuals to reproduce, and for the species to recover. Lately I've seen a few more toads than I have for a while. This is reassuring.
















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Coming right up -- International Talk Like a Pirate Day! Click on the logo below for more information:
http://www.talklikeapirate.com/

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of late 19th century steamship traffic to Ocracoke, and the large Victorian hotel that accommodated the guests. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082114.htm.

Monday, September 15, 2014

Counting Toes

The Atlantic Ocean at Ocracoke is almost always a great place for everyone in the family. Unless there is a storm brewing offshore, the ocean is usually safe, but still exciting. The bottom does not drop off suddenly, and the waves can be gentle enough for young children and elders. But sometimes the waves are powerful enough for dramatic boogie-boarding or serious surfing. In addition, the ocean is clean, and the beaches uncluttered

On Saturday the ocean was noticeably different. Lachlan and I went out to the beach in the morning for a quick swim, and stayed for an hour and a half. There were a few waves, but mostly the water was gentle and relaxing. Usually the water is a bit cloudy because constant wave action stirs up the sand. But Saturday the water was so clear that I could stand submerged up to my chin and still clearly see every one of my toes.

Neither Lachan nor I wanted to get out of the water, but we reluctantly went home to have some lunch.

I went back again in the afternoon!

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Coming right up -- International Talk Like a Pirate Day! Click on the logo below for more information:
http://www.talklikeapirate.com/

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of late 19th century steamship traffic to Ocracoke, and the large Victorian hotel that accommodated the guests. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082114.htm

Sunday, September 14, 2014

Drying Racks or ?

I recently came across this picture of the home of Rev. George Leffers (Leff) Fulcher (1838-1898) and his wife Cynthia Stowe Fulcher (1848-1913). They lived in Frisco, on Hatteras Island. The photo was reproduced in the book Fulcher Family by Ruth Fulcher Rickert.
















In addition to being a wonderful vintage photo of a typical Hatteras Island home before the outbreak of the Civil War, the picture includes two interesting objects in the front yard. If you look closely you will notice two posts about 6' high (a man is standing next to each one). You might want to enlarge the photo to get a better view (instructions on the right). 

Each post has about ten rows of sticks attached horizontally to the post at intervals of perhaps six or eight inches. It looks to me as if each row includes four sticks (two side by side, one on each side of the post; with two more directly on top of them at right angles).

I have shown the photo to several Ocracoke islanders, but no one has ever seen anything like this before. My guess is that these objects were used for  cultivating pole beans...or perhaps for drying fish. Any other guesses?


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Coming right up -- International Talk Like a Pirate Day! Click on the logo below for more information:
http://www.talklikeapirate.com/

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of late 19th century steamship traffic to Ocracoke, and the large Victorian hotel that accommodated the guests. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082114.htm.

Saturday, September 13, 2014

Story & a Jump

Many of our readers know my house on Lawton Lane...a traditional "story and a jump," as they say in eastern North Carolina. These one-and-a-half story cottages were popular on Ocracoke from the mid- 1800s through the early twentieth century. A number of these iconic homes have been preserved on the island. Below are photos of the Kugler Cottage, the first "summer" cottage on Ocracoke.

Kugler Cottage Photo by Kati Wharton

Upstairs Bedroom

Downstairs Bedroom




































 
Sound View by Kati Wharton















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Coming right up -- International Talk Like a Pirate Day! Click on the logo below for more information:
http://www.talklikeapirate.com/

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of late 19th century steamship traffic to Ocracoke, and the large Victorian hotel that accommodated the guests. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082114.htm.