Friday, September 21, 2018

Fresh Figs & Goat Cheese

Post-hurricane Florence, with businesses closed awaiting a visitors re-entry notice, was a rare opportunity to catch up on chores we had been putting off since the beginning of the tourist season. It was also a chance to relax and enjoy the late summer weather.

The last of our figs were ripening, and we decided to treat ourselves to a small gourmet delicacy before dinner...fresh figs and goat cheese.
















We cut the figs in half, topped them with a dollop of goat cheese and an almond. Then we dripped a bit of pure honey and a drizzle of balsamic vinegar over them. Into the broiler they went for a few minutes.

We took the figs out onto the pizer with a bottle of Gewurztraminer wine and enjoyed our evening appetizer as we watched the sun cast ever longer shadows across the sandy lane. Island life is good even after a storm. 

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is an essay by Philip Howard explaining why he decided to stay on the island as Hurricane Florence approached. You can read it here: https://www.villagecraftsmen.com/why-i-stayed/.

Thursday, September 20, 2018

Why I Stayed

Hurricane Florence has battered North Carolina, leaving a legacy of destruction, flooding, and death. The consequences of the storm are still being felt. We on Ocracoke, who know the power of hurricanes, are heartbroken over the misery Florence is causing for our neighbors to the south and west. This storm will not soon be forgotten.

As many of our readers are aware, most islanders evacuated, but about 200 Ocracoke residents decided to ride out the storm. I was one of them.

Some family, friends, and neighbors have asked why I decided to stay. To them it seemed like a foolish decision. As reply I penned a short essay, "Why I Stayed," which we have published as our September Newsletter. You can read it here: https://www.villagecraftsmen.com/why-i-stayed/.

I hope I have conveyed my reasons for what I consider an informed decision. I might have been mistaken, but the situation turned out much as I hoped and expected. I won't second guess anyone else's decision. I hope others will respect mine.

Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Ocracoke Village, 1932

The following paragraph comes from MotorBoating Magazine, Jan, 1932:

"Dropping our baggage [at the Pamlico Inn] and inquiring as to the supper hour, we tramped off toward the village. It has no streets, merely narrow roads of sand, so deep that walking in it is like walking a treadmill. The automobile has invaded Ocracoke and the horses have been turned loose to roam the sand dunes with the cattle. With a population of 500 there are 30 autos. The houses are mostly small, some one story and some two; some are evidently old and others have somewhat modern lines; some are well kept up and some are not. There is a salt water lake in the middle of the town and most of the boats are kept there. At the entrance to this lake is located the Coast Guard Station, which, with the lightkeeper’s house, has the only real grass lawn of the village. The Commanding Officer showed us through the station and explained the uses of his equipment, the several boats, the practice mast, and so on. In each of these stations a man in the tower constantly scans the horizon with a telescope."

The Pamlico Inn












This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of Mrs. Godfrey's ghost who haunts the Island Inn/Odd Fellows Lodge. The story is taken from Chapter Three of my book, Digging up Uncle Evans. You can read the account here: https://www.villagecraAftsmen.com/mrs-godfreys-ghost/.

Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Ocracoke Boats, 1932

From MotorBoating Magazine, Jan, 1932:

"The boats seen at Ocracoke are a gracefully sheered deadrise model with a fairly deep V bottom. All are built of white cedar (Juniper) which is cut in the swamps on the main land. These boats are built on the island. Ribs are spaced about two feet apart, with natural crook knees. The planking is an inch and a quarter thick and there is usually no chine. Also there is no curve to the fore foot although the stem rakes slightly. Two strangers, a high sided clinker built sea-bright dory, and a fairly large Chesapeake Bay bugeye, were seen among the local boats."

A typical Ocracoke Skiff, 2010















This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of Mrs. Godfrey's ghost who haunts the Island Inn/Odd Fellows Lodge. The story is taken from Chapter Three of my book, Digging up Uncle Evans. You can read the account here: https://www.villagecraAftsmen.com/mrs-godfreys-ghost/.

Monday, September 17, 2018

A Sigh of Relief

Ocracoke village was spared once again. Hurricane Florence made landfall far enough south of the Outer Banks that we only received tropical storm force winds and minimal flooding in the village. Nevertheless, there was significant overwash on the north end which covered Highway 12 with sand. It may be several days before that road is cleared.

Yesterday, at 7 am, the Swan Quarter ferry resumed operations bringing emergency personnel, essential personnel, and residents back to Ocracoke. We anticipate that visitors will be permitted back on the island soon. 

Long-time readers of this blog know that we have been an important source of storm-related coverage and photos for many years. However, it has become clear that in these times Facebook does a better job of reaching more people with more information more quickly. That is why we directed our readers to the Village Craftsmen Facebook page for up-to-date Hurricane Florence news. Some of our Facebook posts reached 10,000 to 30,000 people, while a typical blog post would only reach several hundred people.

We apologize to our readers who are not on Facebook, but I just didn't have the time or energy during the storm to post in both places.

On the other hand, this blog continues to be the place to post short articles about the history, culture, and traditions of this very special island community. In our posts later this week look for stories about Ocracoke and our community in 1932, then even more insights into island life in the weeks ahead. 

We look forward to sharing more...especially since there was so little damage from Florence, and the village will be back to normal in short order! We hope you will be visiting soon. 

Heartfelt thanks to all of our faithful readers who let us know you were thinking about us and wishing us shelter and protection from the storm. We appreciate you all!!

Wednesday, September 12, 2018

Florence Info

Amy & Lachlan left the island yesterday. David & I are here. Amy has tasked me with updating our Facebook page. I don't think I will have the time or energy to post both on Facebook and on this blog so please follow our posts about the progress of Florence on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Village-Craftsmen-185596684826166/

Many thanks to all of our readers who have sent us messages of concern. We appreciate them all!

Philip
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Pre-Florence Photos

Just a few photos from this morning.

Some houses boarded up:














The 1718 Brew Pub:














Cars & Boats in the NPS Parking Area:














 Empty Streets:


 

Tuesday, September 11, 2018

Hurricane Florence - Press Release #5

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Press Release #5: Hurricane Florence
Mandatory Evacuation for all of Hyde County
Effective at 12:00 pm, Tuesday, September 11, the Hyde County Board of Commissioners have extended the mandatory evacuation order to encompass all of Hyde County, mainland and island. There are no travel restrictions on the mainland at this time. We strongly encourage all residents to evacuate to safety. This storm is extremely dangerous and should be treated as such.

The designated evacuation shelter for Hyde County residents is Knightdale High School, 100 Bryan Chalk Ln, Knightdale, NC 27545. This shelter is open to all Hyde County residents that wish to utilize it. The shelter will open on Tuesday, September 11 at 2:00 pm. The shelter is pet friendly and equipped to handle animals.

We are currently looking for certified bus drivers to help with the evacuation of citizens to the shelter. If you can assist or know someone that can, please contact the EOC at 252-926-3715.

The evacuation of Ocracoke residents and visitors will continue today, with all ferries currently running their regularly scheduled routes. Entry to Ocracoke is restricted to authorized personnel only.
 
Ocracoke entry priorities are as follows:

1) Emergency Personnel and Equipment
2) NCDOT Highway and Power Company Personnel and Equipment
3) Sanitation Personnel and Equipment
4) Mail and Parcel Delivery
5) Commodities and Fuel Vendors until ferry operations cease

Current storm surge models are showing anywhere from 1-9 feet of surge depending on where you are located in the county, increasing from east to west. See picture below for a reference.

County offices will close at noon, Wednesday, September 12. All alcohol sales will be suspended on the mainland at 5:00 pm Wednesday, September 12.

For those without a means to travel to safety, Hyde County is planning to offer transportation and more information will be forthcoming. Officials are finalizing these plans and hope to release more details by Tuesday afternoon. If you have any questions regarding the evacuation, shelter or have any other special needs, please contact the Hyde County Emergency Operations Center at 252-926-3715.



Hyde County, NC

Press Release: September 11, 2018 12:00pm

Donnie Shumate 
Public Information Officer
dshumate@hydecountync.gov
(252) 542-0083

Hurricane Florence - Press Release #4

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Press Release #4: Hurricane Florence - Hyde County Evacuation Shelter
The designated evacuation shelter for Hyde County residents is Knightdale High School, 100 Bryan Chalk Ln, Knightdale, NC 27545. This shelter is open to all Hyde County residents that wish to utilize it. The shelter will open on Tuesday, September 11 at 2:00 pm. The shelter is pet friendly and equipped to handle animals.

For those without a means to travel to safety, Hyde County is planning to offer transportation assistance and more information will be forthcoming. Officials are finalizing these plans and hope to release more details by Tuesday afternoon. If you have any questions regarding the evacuation or shelter, contact the Hyde County Emergency Operations Center at 252-926-3715.


Hyde County, NC

Press Release: September 10, 2018 10:30pm

Donnie Shumate 
Public Information Officer
dshumate@hydecountync.gov
(252) 542-0083