Friday, December 11, 2015

Where is This?

The following photo was taken by Henry Raup sometime between 1974 and 1978. I believe these two modest rental cottages were built from lumber salvaged from the old Navy barracks.












Today, this small home (below) sits where the cottage above (left) was located. I believe this home was built around the original cottage, which still remains part of the structure.














Notice how much the landscape has changed. Where once there was just sand, yucca plants and sand spurs, there is now grass and cedars.

Can any of our readers identify where this cottage is?

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of Capt. Horatio Williams and his schooner, the Paragon. You can read the story here: www.villagecraftsmen.com/news112115.htm.

18 comments:

  1. I can see the concrete road in the older photo, so maybe Sunset Drive (Old Ammunition Dump Road)?

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    1. Good guess, but, no, not Ammunition Dump Road. I will post the location in a few days, after others have had a chance at identifying this area.

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    2. it's the road behind Sunset Dr.

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    3. OBXGirl, I am not sure what you mean by "behind" Sunset Dr. But I am going to count this as a correct answer. The photos were not taken on First Avenue or Cabana Drive, both of which parallel Sunset Drive. They were taken on Sand Dollar Drive, which also parallels Sunset Drive. You can find the roads on this Ocracoke Village map: http://www.ocracokevillage.com/files/RoadMap/VILLAGE_PRINT_VILLAGE_MAP_2013.jpg

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  2. Anonymous8:26 AM

    Now there is grass and cedars... a sand spur is a member of the grass family, therefore there was always "grass" --why is not the Seaside Fl landscape plant materials list considered for a yard? Actually, is not the first photo more charming it says Beach. The second photo looks like a typical house on a typical street on the Mainland. What is going on with the house siding?. I always thought weathered cedar shakes aged to a silver grey (curb appeal) but the brown appears to be neglected. Incidentally in this day and age of brands and image - iconic images -does one leave OI with a mind set of brown shingled cottages and rusting mobile homes or a place of manicured lawns and properly maintained housing? Has the google car captured the street view roads on OI?

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    1. I don't know if Google has street views of Ocracoke roads.

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    2. Anonymous12:33 AM

      According to the This Old House site red cedar far better then white cedar shingles. The tannins in the red cedar are a preservative and add to the durability of the material. As there was a rain puddle in the picture, perhaps the house was wet and the overcast day did not do the house justice. On a bright sun shiny day I'm sure the house is quite beautiful.

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  3. Anonymous11:12 AM

    You mention "sand spurs" - do you mean those terrible little 1/4" or so spiky balls that cling to everything and are very sharp? Having camped on the Outer Banks for many years, they seem to be a relative newcomer, at least to the Buxton area. There were never any, and now they seem to be trying to make their way into the Cape Point campground. The last time I was around the old lighthouse site, they were absolutely everywhere. I had assumed they were a recent addition to the Outer Banks environment, but based on your comment, perhaps they have been around longer than I thought?

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    1. Sand spurs have been around for a long time. They were a nuisance when I was a child (and I am 71 years old).

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  4. Anonymous4:45 PM

    a word of warning....I had a thorn/needle from a prickly pear go through a month old pair of leather reebok tennis shoes....it had no problem doing so....I hate to think what might have happened if I was not wearing shoes at all!

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  5. I'm going to guess the house is in North Pond?

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    1. No, not at North Pond.

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  6. Anonymous1:35 PM

    My Uncle Otts and Aunt Dottie once owned these cottages. Their son and daughter in law, Charlie O'Neal and Sandy live on Ocracoke. Charlie noted the following, "THEY WERE MOVED FROM THE FISH CAMPS BY STANLEY WAHAB. THERE WERE A TOTAL OF FOUR MOVED THERE!" Another one of these houses from the fish camp was next door to our house on Lighhouse Rd and was recently torn down and replaced.

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    1. Thanks for the information. I knew William Arthur and Dottie once owned them, but didn't know they came from the fish camps.

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  7. Anonymous7:45 AM

    In North Carolina a "resort" exists, its housing stock of rental units are/were the cabins , what original cabins, if they still exist; built for the men and women that worked for the TVA constructing Fontana Dam. As a child, a visit during the mid 60's left a life long impression
    of North Carolina as a wonderful place. Things have changed-- one can see in before and after photos, but I have my memories. PS we usually slept in a canvas tent in sleeping bags on the ground on an inflated rubber mattress. So yeah, it was a resort.

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  8. Anonymous8:20 AM

    Interesting story. Where and what and when were the fish camps?

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    1. Good question. Look for a blog post sometime in January about Ocracoke Fish Camps.

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    2. See our post on January 14, 2016 for more information about fish camps.

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