Monday, December 19, 2011

Passing on Traditions

As we were looking through old photos, Amy and David were struck by how this one of my father and me made them think of Lachlan and David. So, they decided to recreate the photo. As they were inspecting the original to see what my dad was sitting on, Amy went running to her back porch and returned with the very wastebasket he had been using as a perch. The traditions, stories and even the stuff gets passed on for future generations to use and enjoy!

Lawton and Philip Howard, 1950:



















Fiddler Dave Tweedie and Lachlan, 2011:



















Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of Ocracoke and the "Lost" Colony. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news112111.htm.

11 comments:

  1. Anonymous7:19 AM

    Philip,

    Interesting to note the striking resemblance between you and Lachlan, when you were his age. Were you aware of it yourself? Suppose that'd be just one more reason--as if any were needed--to further strengthen a bond between a lucky grandfather and a lucky grandson.

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  2. Anonymous7:29 AM

    Philip, such wholesomeness...good, family values....quality time together....strong foundation. You know how blessed you were to have your Daddy and Lachlan is equally blessed to have David for a Dad as well as having you for a Grandfather and growing up on Ocracoke Island. It is a grand childhood and one day, mostlikely, Lachlan will be sharing these memories with his children.

    It's all "good stuff". NC Mainlander here cherishes these simply joys more and more each day. Even that trashcan is something special!

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  3. Anonymous7:33 AM

    In a word--PRICELESS!

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  4. Anonymous8:52 AM

    Of course the family resemblance should exist, personally I find the family heirloom the waste paper basket--the fact it is still in the family charming. In this paperless society such a thing has found its true purpose a seat. Also the clothes line. I suppose the proper technique of using a clothes line should be addressed --true time management skills-- the foundation of the original life line. The conversations engaged in when one had help to hang wet clothes or when folding freshly air dried laundry -- It was a commitment to to doing something the old fashioned way ( time and effort for sure) and the world is better for it.

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  5. Jack and Toni Walls4:01 PM

    Wonderful pictures. Rich family history. Thank you for sharing both.

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  6. Debbie Leonard6:41 PM

    Philip, did your dad play with the fiddle down on his chest like that? I have always liked that style of holding the fiddle.

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  7. Debbie, sometimes my dad played his fiddle as in the photo, but not always. My dad was not a real accomplished fiddler (unlike my son-in-law David), but it certainly gave him a great deal of pleasure.

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  8. Anonymous9:40 PM

    Didn't you once say he played the mandolin?

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  9. Anonymous10:48 PM

    i love it!

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  10. My dad did also play a bit on the mandolin, as well as on the fiddle. He never had any lessons, and seldom played with anyone else. But he would entertain himself (and others walking by his house on a spring or summer evening) for an hour or more.

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  11. Anonymous9:37 AM

    From Anon.9:40...Appreciate the reply. So nice when you can share your precious memories.

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