Friday, March 16, 2018

Old Quawk's Day

Below is my annual tribute to Old Quawk:

About 200 years ago there lived on Ocracoke Island a fisherman of indeterminate provenance. He was a reclusive figure, preferring to live in a small hut made of driftwood and bullrushes about 5-6 miles from the village. No one remembers his given name, but folks called him "Old Quawk" because, they said, he "quawked" like an old night heron.

Old Quawk was a fisherman, often venturing out into Pamlico Sound in his sail skiff when cautious islanders stayed in port waiting for more propitious weather.

On this date, March 16, many years past, Old Quawk made his last voyage into Pamlico Sound. Storm clouds were piling up in the darkening sky. Legend has it that Old Quawk defiantly disregarded the warnings of other islanders, raised his clenched fist to the heavens and dared the gods to thwart him, then set out in his sail skiff. A frightful gale churned the Sound into a wild turbulence and swamped Old Quawk's tiny craft. Neither Old Quawk nor his boat were ever found.


"Old Quawk" in July 4th Parade















For many years Ocracoke fishermen refused to go out in their boats on March 16. Even today it's best to be prudent on Old Quawk's Day. There's no telling what the weather gods will dish out on March 16.
For another account of Old Quawk see https://www.ncpedia.org/old-quawks-day.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter, a newspaper article published in 1923 titled "Quaintest Town in America," provides a fascinating glimpse of Ocracoke Island life a century ago. You can read it here:
https://www.villagecraftsmen.com/quaintest-town-america-n-c-island/ .

6 comments:

  1. Anonymous6:06 AM

    This story never gets old.

    ReplyDelete
  2. My favorite day. I post my "pome" every year to Face Book. :-)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Anonymous10:31 AM















    Philip - Thank you for giving us this beautifully written story every year. Robb, please post your "pome" here to illustrate Philip's sensitive story.
    Bobby

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Robb's poem was published in the comment section of our post for March 16th, 2016. Enjoy.

      Delete
  4. Anonymous3:28 PM

    Thank you, I found it. Another fine poem from Robb Foster.

    ReplyDelete
  5. So sorry! I just now saw this. I've been busy this week and last transitioning to a new job and just now had the chance to catch up on Phillip's most excellent blog! If you're really interested, I've published a book called Lyrics and Poems From the Shenandoah that is available at Amazon in both Kindle and Paperback. I have quite a few in there about the beach and Ocracoke...

    ReplyDelete